Sunset Behind Tree

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Tonight I took a walk at sunset to a favorite outdoor space and conservation land. This tree said more to me the longer i gazed at it.

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Here’s Why I Love Wyoming

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  The light, the distances, the storms, the way the Tetons just rise up from the valley floor.

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Annual Homage to the Tomatoes of Verrill Farm

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Along with swimming in a clear New England pond or the chilly Atlantic the other great joy of summer is fresh veggies. I never miss the summer harvest at Verrill Farm in Concord, MA where my favorite crops include the sweetest corn, most buttery potatoes, and most colorful and diverse tomatoes to be found in the Boston area.

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Sunset on Lake Quannapowitt

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Sunset on Lake Quannapowitt

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Nature Photography Tips 20 and 21

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Although the eye and brain attempt to neutralize the perceived color of light, your brain and eye can still sense the difference between the light of a cool shaded forest and the warm tones of sunset on the beach. Cameras don’t have this power or sensitivity; at least not yet.

Today’s digital cameras think that average daylight is somewhere between 5500° and 6000° Kelvin. Years ago I read that this value was a measurement of sunlight at high noon on the Summer Solstice as it occurs in Washington, D.C. This could be folklore, but it sounds nice!

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Nature Photography Tips 1 to 5

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Today I’m launching a series of short tips about how to improve your nature photography. Each post will have about 5 pointers and my working list currently runs to fifty points. At some time in the near future all the points will be published as an e-book or perhaps, something more ambitious. Your comments are welcome!

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Landscape Photography Inspired by Hudson River Painters

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When photography was in its infancy in the early 19th century, the art of landscape painting was approaching a new zenith. In its time, the work of the members of the Hudson River School and later, the White Mountain School, was growing in popularity on both sides of the Atlantic.

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